DEBATE ENTRE BERTRAND RUSSELL Y COPLESTON PDF

On January 28, the British philosophers F. Copleston was a Jesuit priest who believed in God. Russell maintained that while he was technically agnostic on the existence of the Judeo-Christian God--just as he was technically agnostic on the existence of the Greek gods Zeus and Poseidon--he was for all intents and purposes an atheist. The famous debate is divided into two parts: metaphysical and moral. In the metaphysical part, which is presented here, Copleston espouses what is known as the cosmological argument for the existence of God.

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Moral Psychology and Ethical Theory. John Cooper, Copleston and Bertrand Russell. Natural Law. If you had admitted this, we could then have discussed whether that being is personal, good, and so on.

First, as to the metaphysical argument: The infinity of the series of contingent beings, even if proved, would be irrelevant. Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Religion: That is, of beings no dopleston of which can account for its own existence. The Cosmological Argument — F. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Whether he was an agnostic or atheist is a question he had addressed before; while technically agnostic with regard to the Christian God, as with the Greek Gods, to all intents and purposes he can bertrqnd considered an atheist.

You say that the series of events needs no explanation: Something does exist; therefore, there must be something which accounts for this fact, a being which is entee the series of contingent beings. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I say that if there were no necessary being, no being which must exist and cannot not-exist, nothing would exist. This website uses cookies to improve your experience while you navigate through the website. Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are as essential for the working of basic functionalities of the website.

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Copleston–Russell debate

The debate centers on two points: the metaphysical and moral arguments for the existence of God. But to "the ordinary man in the street" he would identify himself as an atheist as he thought the Christian God no more likely to exist than gods of Ancient Greece and he thought neither "sufficiently probable to be worth serious consideration". Copleston argued that the existence of God can be proved from contingency , and thought that only the existence of God would make sense of human's moral and religious experience: [3]. First, that the existence of God can be philosophically proved by a metaphysical argument; secondly, that it is only the existence of God that will make sense of man's moral experience and of religious experience. That is, of beings no one of which can account for its own existence. You say that the series of events needs no explanation: I say that if there were no necessary being, no being which must exist and cannot not-exist, nothing would exist. The infinity of the series of contingent beings, even if proved, would be irrelevant.

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I say that if there were no necessary being, no being which must exist and cannot not-exist, nothing would exist. Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Religion: The infinity of the series of contingent beings, even if proved, would be irrelevant. Russell however found both arguments unconvincing. Views Read Edit View history. Something does exist; therefore, there must be something which accounts for this fact, a being which is outside the series of contingent beings. Archived from the original on 22 June You say that the series of events needs no explanation: Whether he was an agnostic or atheist is a question he had addressed before; while technically agnostic with regard to the Christian God, as with the Greek Gods, to all intents and purposes he can be considered an atheist. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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