FAI ARESTI AEROBATIC CATALOGUE PDF

The catalog broadly classifies manoeuvers into numbered families. Families 1 through 8 depict basic figures, such as turns, loops and vertical lines; family 9 depicts rotational elements that can be added to basic figures to increase difficulty, change the direction of flight or invert the g-loading of the aircraft. In Aresti notation, solid lines represent upright or positive-g manoeuvers and dashed lines represent inverted or negative-g manoeuvers; these are sometimes depicted in red. Thick dot represents the beginning of the manoeuver, while a short perpendicular line represents the end. Stalled wing manoeuvers such as spins and snap flick rolls are represented by triangles. Arrows represent rolling manoeuvers with numbers representing the extent and number of segments of the roll.

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How do pilots know what aerobatic manoeuvres they have to fly when they compete? Named after Jose Aresti , a Spanish aerobatics instructor who developed them in the s, they use a system of lines, arrows, geometric shapes and numbers to describe the precise form of a manoeuvre.

The system allows pilots to understand what is expected of them in training or competition, and it also allows pilots to invent new figures. They are published in book form by the Aresti family, as the Aresti Catalogue. This forms the FAI standards document on the aerobatic figures permitted in competition. Family 1: Horizontal, degree and vertical lines Family 2: Turns and rolling turns Family 3: Combination of lines Family 4: No longer used Family 5: Hammerheads, also known as stall turns Family 6: Tail slides Family 7: Loops and part loops, curved and angular Family 8: Combinations of loops and lines Family 9: Rolls, snap rolls and spins.

Families are the basic figures, while family 9 adds a rotational element that can be added to the basic figures to increase difficulty. Although at first sight they may look like hieroglyphics, Aresti notation is fairly straightforward:. A number represents the extent and number of segments.

Each manoeuvre is given a unique catalogue number, and also a difficulty factor known as the K-factor. Typically a competition sequence consists of 10 figures. Judges mark each figure out of 10 perfect and 0. Jose Aresti first published a book of aerobatic figures in They were quickly adopted by the Spanish Aero Club, who then lobbied for them to be accepted across the world. They were then adopted worldwide.

In competition, special software is used to design and display Aresti figures. In this way, a sequence of 10 figures is created — nine of which the pilots will not have seen before the competition.

Home News Understanding Aresti figures in Aerobatic competition. Twitter Facebook. Understanding Aresti figures in Aerobatic competition. The answer lies in understanding what are called Aresti figures. The catalogue classifies manoeuvres into numbered families from The catalogue is not available online — it is published in print form by Aresti Systems SL.

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How do pilots know what aerobatic manoeuvres they have to fly when they compete? Named after Jose Aresti , a Spanish aerobatics instructor who developed them in the s, they use a system of lines, arrows, geometric shapes and numbers to describe the precise form of a manoeuvre. The system allows pilots to understand what is expected of them in training or competition, and it also allows pilots to invent new figures. They are published in book form by the Aresti family, as the Aresti Catalogue. This forms the FAI standards document on the aerobatic figures permitted in competition. Family 1: Horizontal, degree and vertical lines Family 2: Turns and rolling turns Family 3: Combination of lines Family 4: No longer used Family 5: Hammerheads, also known as stall turns Family 6: Tail slides Family 7: Loops and part loops, curved and angular Family 8: Combinations of loops and lines Family 9: Rolls, snap rolls and spins. Families are the basic figures, while family 9 adds a rotational element that can be added to the basic figures to increase difficulty.

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Welcome, Log in. Press Note. Attending this meeting as well, were, Mr. Alvaro de Orleans-Borbon, vicepresident for Spain of the F. In , Mr. This way, will be restored from now on the name of Mr. Antonio Quintana as president of the Commitee.

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