KERRISK LINUX PROGRAMMING INTERFACE PDF

Without subscribers, LWN would simply not exist. While it is a hefty tome " thick enough to stun an ox " as Laurie Anderson might say , it is eminently readable, both by browsing through it or by biting the bullet and reading it straight through. The coverage of the Linux system call interface is encyclopedic, but the writing style is very approachable. It is, in short, an excellent reference that will likely find its way onto the bookshelves of user-space developers and kernel hackers—including some who aren't necessarily primarily focused on Linux.

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Without subscribers, LWN would simply not exist. While it is a hefty tome " thick enough to stun an ox " as Laurie Anderson might say , it is eminently readable, both by browsing through it or by biting the bullet and reading it straight through.

The coverage of the Linux system call interface is encyclopedic, but the writing style is very approachable. It is, in short, an excellent reference that will likely find its way onto the bookshelves of user-space developers and kernel hackers—including some who aren't necessarily primarily focused on Linux.

Kerrisk has been the maintainer of the Linux man pages since , which gives him a good perspective on the Linux API. As he says in the preface, it is quite likely that you have already read some of his work in sections 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 of those pages. But the book is not a collection of man pages though it covers much of the same ground. The style and organization is much less dry, and more explanatory, than a typical man entry.

The book is some pages in length, which makes it a rather daunting prospect to review. Once I started reading it, though, it was quite approachable. Kerrisk's clear descriptions of various system calls and other parts of the Linux API made it easy to keep reading. I set out to pick and choose certain chapters to read, and just skim the others, but found myself reading quite a bit more than that—which might partially explain the lateness of this review.

The book is organized into 64 chapters of around 20 pages each, which makes for nice bite-sized chunks that allow for reading the book around other tasks. While the focus is on Linux, Kerrisk doesn't neglect other Unix varieties and notes where they differ from Linux.

TLPI was written for kernel version 2. In the text, though, Kerrisk is careful to indicate which kernel version introduced a new feature, so that those working with older kernels will know which they can use. While it is primarily looking at the 2. The book starts with a bit of history, going all the way back to Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie and then moving forward to the present, looking at the various branches of the Unix tree.

It then moves into a description of what an operating system is, the role that the kernel plays, and some of the overarching concepts that make up Unix and Linux. While this information may be unnecessary for most Linux hackers, it will come in handy for those coming to Linux from other operating systems.

The ideas that "everything is a file" and that files are just streams of bytes are described in ways that will quickly get a system programmer up to speed on the "Unix way". After that introductory material, Kerrisk launches into the chapters that cover aspects of the system call interface. This makes up the vast majority of the book and each of these chapters is fairly self-contained. They build on the earlier chapters, but the text is replete with references to other sections.

In the preface, Kerrisk says that he attempted to minimize forward references, but that clearly was a difficult task as there are often as many forward as backward references in a chapter. Navigating within the book is easy to do because there are frequent numbered section and subsection headings, along with the chapter number on each page.

Other technical books could benefit from that style. There is also an almost too detailed index that runs to more than 50 pages.

Each chapter comes with sample code that is easy to read and understand. Importantly, the examples also do a good job of demonstrating the topic at hand and some of them could be adapted into useful utilities. Each chapter also has a handful of exercises for the reader, some of which have answers in one of the appendices. So, what does the book cover? It would be easy to say "all of it", but that would be something of a cop-out, and a bit inaccurate as well.

There is a chapter covering directories and links, as well as one that looks at the inotify file event notification call. There are multiple chapters on processes, threads, signals, as well as chapters covering process groups and sessions, and process priorities and scheduling.

Of particular interest to me were a chapter on writing secure privileged programs and one on Linux capabilities. There are two chapters on shared libraries, the first of which is more about the ideas underlying libraries and shared libraries along with how to build them, rather than the dlopen system call and friends , which is covered in the second.

There are, perhaps, too many chapters covering interprocess communication IPC , with separate chapters devoted to each System V IPC mechanism shared memory, message queues, and semaphores.

After IPC, comes a chapter on file locking followed by six chapters covering sockets. Those chapters look at Unix and internet domain sockets, along with server design and advanced sockets topics.

There is more, of course, and looking at the detailed table of contents will fill out the list. It also points out some of the warts and historical cruft that is carried along in that API.

Kerrisk is not shy about noting things like that where appropriate in the text: " In summary, System V message queues are often best avoided. There were two specific topics that I looked forward to reading about but were only marginally covered by the book. The first is containers and namespaces, which are very briefly mentioned in a discussion of the flags to the clone system call.

A more puzzling omission is that there is almost no mention of the ptrace system call. In the few places it does come up, readers are referred to the ptrace 2 man page. There are certainly other parts of the Linux API that could have been covered, beyond the system call interface—sysfs, splice , and perf come to mind—but Kerrisk undoubtedly needed to draw the line somewhere. Overall, he did an excellent job of that.

Technical books, especially those covering Linux, have a tendency to get stale rather quickly, but TLPI shouldn't suffer from that as much as a kernel internals book would, for example. There should really only be additions down the road as the user-space API is maintained by the kernel developers "forever", but updates will presumably need to be made eventually.

There are a handful of additional complaints I could make about the book, but they are all quite minor, as were those mentioned above. The biggest nit is that the "asides" in the text, which are numerous, are really often much more than just asides. Each is set off from the rest of text, indented and rendered in a slightly smaller font which is typographically a bit annoying to me , and are meant to contain additional information that is not necessarily critical to understanding the topic.

In my experience, though, many of them might best have been worked into the main text. See what I mean about minor complaints? This is a book that will be useful to application and system-level developers, primarily, but there is much of interest for others as well. Kernel hackers will find it useful to ensure their new feature or fix doesn't break the existing API. Programmers who are primarily targeting other Unix systems may also find it useful for making their code more portable.

I found it to be extremely useful and expect to return to it frequently. Anyone who has an interest in programming for Linux will likely feel the same way. Review: The Linux Programming Interface. I sooooo needed a book like this that I even contemplated writing it myself. However, a full range of other ebook formats is currently in production, and when those formats are available they will be sold through the usual retail channels and made available to No Starch customers who already have the ebook.

I expect those other formats to be available around mid-February. It's huge, but each particular section is well split up, so they are digestible chunks. Those parts I have read so far are interesting and informative. That book is a few years older and obviously less encyclopedic but nonetheless a wonderful and more portable reference.

I have learned the answers to several long-time puzzlements by typing in their examples and picking them apart. Unfortunately it sounds like I need the Kerrisk book too: sigh. I'm delighted to see this listed in the table of contents This is a criminally underdocumented and seemingly little known feature Unix domain sockets within the filesystem are just ugly clutter, and serve no useful purpose The abstract namespace is a brilliant concept, which I wish all other Unices would steal And, using filesystem permissions to control access of Unix domain sockets is highly unportable Many systems totally ignore perms on Unix domain sockets, making them effectively always , like symlinks That's not a shortcoming of lsof, but a shortcoming of having a separate namespace.

It goes against all the Unix traditions. Well, personally I don't care about other Unixes. However, ability to use AppArmor to restrict access to sockets somehow makes me feel more secure. Not when it comes to sockets, it doesn't How do you think lsof deals with those?

Right, it has to deal with a separate namespace Just like it should be taught how to do with Linux's abstract Unix domain namespace What, aside from lsof, actually needs to ever reference a Unix domain socket by pathname as if it were a file, anyway?

It's not like you can just pass one to an arbitrary app which is expecting a file, and expect it to do anything sensible Like, for instance, you can do with a named pipe That's a case where existing in the filesystem is actually useful They're just special creatures that happen to be identified via a pathname You can't do that on a socket "file" I'm all in favor of "everything as a file", having used Unix-like systems for well over 20 years now But, I'm not in favor of leaving tons of file-like tokens scattered all over the filesystem, which can't actually be used like files for anything, and which only exist there for the sole purpose of having a unique name to identify them by Which is a shortcoming of Unix design which was fixed in 9p, btw.

How about security with AppArmor? Does your namespace work with chroot? Also, unix sockets have a creation time which helped me once. Not really. How does Plan9 deal with this? Can you just open up a TCP socket, and somehow specify a host and port to connect to, or one to listen on?

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Review: The Linux Programming Interface

Explore a preview version of The Linux Programming Interface right now. In this authoritative work, Linux programming expert Michael Kerrisk provides detailed descriptions of the system calls and library functions that you need in order to master the craft of system programming, and accompanies his explanations with clear, complete example programs. You'll find descriptions of over system calls and library functions, and more than example programs, 88 tables, and diagrams. You'll learn how to:.

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The Linux Programming Interface

It covers a wide array of topics dealing with the Linux operating system and operating systems in general, as well as providing a brief history of Unix and how it led to the creation of Linux. It provides many samples of code written in the C programming language, and provides learning exercises at the end of many chapters. Kerrisk is a former writer for the Linux Weekly News [1] and the current maintainer for the Linux man pages project, [2]. Anyone who has an interest in programming for Linux will likely feel the same way.

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