KEW GARDENS VIRGINIA WOOLF ESPAOL PDF

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Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Kew Gardens by Virginia Woolf. Kew Gardens by Virginia Woolf. In , at The Hogarth Press, Virginia Woolf produced and published a limited edition of what was to become one of her best-loved stories.

The book's jacket design and page illustrations were by her sister, artist Vanessa Bell. The lu In , at The Hogarth Press, Virginia Woolf produced and published a limited edition of what was to become one of her best-loved stories. The lush and haunting story circles around Kew Gardens one hot day in July, as various odd and interesting couples walk by and talk, exchanging words but letting thoughts and memories float languorously above the glossy leaves and exotic blooms, while at their feet, a determined snail makes its way slowly across a mountainous flower bed.

Elegantly produced, a precise replica of that special edition, with Vanessa Bell's jacket and decorative drawings, this is a rare treat for Bloomsbury devotees and all who love beautiful books. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published by Norwood Editions first published More Details Original Title. Kew Gardens, Richmond, London, England.

Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Kew Gardens , please sign up. Tania A short story. Just one, not a collection. See 1 question about Kew Gardens…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details.

More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Kew Gardens. Aren't they one's past, all that remains of it, those men and women, those ghosts lying under the trees, Its success also brought a certain change of fortune for the Woolfs and the Hogarth press.

What stayed with me from the effervesce of fleeting moments is the prominent and moving role Woolf gives to the little snail - so stubborn, determined and willing to make its way creeping through the flowerbed, exploring and considering to overcome the obstacles it meets.

Before he had decided whether to circumvent the arched tent of a dead leaf or to breast it there came past the bed the feet of other human beings.

When we were walking towards Kew alongside the river Thames, approaching the Gardens coming from Ham house, I was unaware Virginia Woolf had been living in Richmond from to When moving there, Kew Gardens soon became a favourite walking destination of hers, often wandering there with her dogs, as her doctors advised her to go for long walks.

Perhaps, without knowing so, we had been walking where she used to walk? I like to imagine we did. The story can be read here. View all 50 comments. Aren't they one's past, all that remains of it, those men and women, those ghosts lying under the trees View 2 comments.

Feb 14, Annelies rated it really liked it Shelves: non-contemporary-uk. Only Woolf can write about ordinary things in such a short story and make you long for more. She easily moves from one subject to another in a natural way. You can imagine Kew Gardens on this summers day. Feel the sun, see the colours of the flowers, subject you to the struggle of the snail to move forward, see and hear the people strolling around. Actually there happens quite of nothing but she makes it look like a great deal.

That's the capacity of a really great author. View all 7 comments. Aren't they one's past, all that remains of it, those men and women, those ghosts lying under the trees…one's happiness, one's reality? With several edits it could easily fit within Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway or her Mrs. Woolf, once more, revisits her favorite themes of passion, desire, love, and regret; "Doesn't one always think of the past, in a garden with men and women lying under the trees? Woolf, once more, revisits her favorite themes of passion, desire, love, and regret; in short, Woolf turns her perceptive again on humanity, once more using stream of consciousness.

What Woolf does brilliantly here is to capture the chaos of life in all its pain, darkness and beauty. View all 4 comments. Kew Gardens is my first short story read of Virginia Woolf. And I have to say that I'm very much impressed.

I think only Virginia can write such an abstract story with mastery. Four different couples, a couple with children, two men - one old and one young, two lower middle class women and a young couple new to love, walk past a flower bed absorbed in their own separate worlds. Their thoughts, words and actions form Kew Gardens is my first short story read of Virginia Woolf.

Their thoughts, words and actions form the story of the short fiction. I have always observed that Virginia does not write proper stories. She describes places, observes nature, exposes human mind and emotion; and these things combined is her story which is uncommon yet at the same time fascinating.

The beauty in this short work lies in Virginia's writing. It is pretty much grand as in almost all the books I have read of her so far. But I felt that her writing is even grander in this short work. I'm certain it is much due to the setting being the beautiful Botanical Gardens of Kew which gave her ample material to weave her imaginary brush with many beautiful and colorful paintings.

Virginia Woolf always leave me in awe after reading her, and I experienced that same wonder after reading Kew Gardens. With every read of hers, she grows more in my esteem.

View all 9 comments. Mar 26, Chavelli Sulikowska rated it it was amazing. Perhaps this is why it is more delicately rendered and uplifting than her later novels, many of which tend to express a more realist and abrupt style.

Kew Gardens is a delight to read, almost whimsical. There is a real softness, dare I say femininity to this story. But it is in works such as Kew Gardens we can appreciate her growth as a writer and the diversity of the pen. View all 3 comments. Nov 06, Mohsin Maqbool rated it really liked it. Similarly, Virginia Woolf too loved Nature and proved her love with alluring descriptive passages in her prose. And mind you, few writers can write the way she does. Yes, it is that beautiful.

And I am not exaggerating. Here is living proof of that. The petals were voluminous enough to be stirred by the summer breeze, and when they moved, the red, blue and yellow lights passed one over the other, staining an inch of the brown earth beneath with a spot of the most intricate colour. The light fell either upon the smooth, grey back of a pebble, or, the shell of a snail with its brown, circular veins, or falling into a raindrop, it expanded with such intensity of red, blue and yellow the thin walls of water that one expected them to burst and disappear.

Instead, the drop was left in a second silver grey once more, and the light now settled upon the flesh of a leaf, revealing the branching thread of fibre beneath the surface, and again it moved on and spread its illumination in the vast green spaces beneath the dome of the heart-shaped and tongue-shaped leaves.

Then the breeze stirred rather more briskly overhead and the colour was flashed into the air above, into the eyes of the men and women who walk in Kew Gardens in July. That she loves delving with colours like an artist from his palette on canvas. In the above-mentioned extract, she has used red, blue, yellow, gold, brown, grey, silver-grey and green.

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A Summary and Analysis of Virginia Woolf’s ‘Kew Gardens’

Set over the course of a hot July afternoon in a flower bed, the story moves from descriptions of plant and insect life to snatches of overhead conversations. Aspects of the first edition highlight that the Woolfs were in the early stages of learning their craft as printers and publishers. The small print run of copies was circulated to private subscribers. Inside the slim pamphlet, we see how the Woolfs have made use of everyday materials — the hand-marbled cover has been printed on the back of peach-pink art-deco-esque wallpaper. Simple methods have been used: the pages, for instance, are hand-sewn together with white thread at four points. Originally the Woolfs printed their full names on the final page, but the finished book reveals how they changed their decision. In the first, Bell flattens perspective to merge the two hatted women with a background of flowers.

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Kew Gardens

FROM THE OVAL-SHAPED flower-bed there rose perhaps a hundred stalks spreading into heart-shaped or tongue-shaped leaves half way up and unfurling at the tip red or blue or yellow petals marked with spots of colour raised upon the surface; and from the red, blue or yellow gloom of the throat emerged a straight bar, rough with gold dust and slightly clubbed at the end. The petals were voluminous enough to be stirred by the summer breeze, and when they moved, the red, blue and yellow lights passed one over the other, staining an inch of the brown earth beneath with a spot of the most intricate colour. The light fell either upon the smooth, grey back of a pebble, or, the shell of a snail with its brown, circular veins, or falling into a raindrop, it expanded with such intensity of red, blue and yellow the thin walls of water that one expected them to burst and disappear. Instead, the drop was left in a second silver grey once more, and the light now settled upon the flesh of a leaf, revealing the branching thread of fibre beneath the surface, and again it moved on and spread its illumination in the vast green spaces beneath the dome of the heart-shaped and tongue-shaped leaves. Then the breeze stirred rather more briskly overhead and the colour was flashed into the air above, into the eyes of the men and women who walk in Kew Gardens in July. The figures of these men and women straggled past the flower-bed with a curiously irregular movement not unlike that of the white and blue butterflies who crossed the turf in zig-zag flights from bed to bed.

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Kew Gardens (short story)

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